Episode 4 – the rate at which sugar is absorbed by the gastro intestinal system affects obesity, diabetes and metabolic health

In episode 4 we discuss why the rate at which you absorb sugar may affect obesity, diabetes and general metabolic health, here is the 2 papers discussed: Effects of small intestinal glucose on glycaemia, insulinaemia and incretin hormone release are load-dependent in obese subjects Link: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27840416 Accelerated intestinal glucose absorption in morbidly obese humans: relationship to glucose transporters, incretin hormones, and glycemia Link: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25423571

Episode 3 – Affecting fat loss in rodents by caloric restriction, knocking out insulin genes and seeing how incretin hormones play into it

In Episode 3 of the Break Nutrition show we discussed rodent studies showing an insulin gene dosage-dependent effect on adiposity, the interplay between caloric restriction & circulating insulin, as well as how incretin hormones affect fat loss dynamics. Caloric Restriction Paradoxically Increases Adiposity in Mice With Genetically Reduced Insulin. Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/27145011/ Suppression of hyperinsulinaemia in growing female mice provides long-term protection against obesity. Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/26155745/?i=3&from=/27145011/related

Episode 2 – trafficking fatty acids properly to avoid ectopic fat deposition

In Episode 2 of the BreakNutrition Show we talked about how dysregulated cycling of fat between fat cells, the liver and the fat we eat can lead to obesity, here is the paper: Downregulation of adipose tissue fatty acid trafficking in obesity: a driver for ectopic fat deposition? Link: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20943748

Episode 1 – Linking dysregulated adipocyte fat flow to diabetes

In Episode 1 of the BreakNutrition Show we talked about how how dysregulated fat flow from fat cells can drive the creation of new glucose in the liver and lead to diabetes, here is the paper: Hepatic acetyl CoA links adipose tissue inflammation to hepatic insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25662011