Episode 24 – Tucker and Gabor on Seed Oils vs Refined Carbs – Part 2

Show notes: You can find Tucker Goodrich at http://yelling-stop.blogspot.com and on Twitter @tuckergoodrich Oxidative stress is the inevitable result of metabolism and basic chemistry, resulting from reactive oxygen species (ROS) like “slow” reacting hydrogen peroxide and “fast” reacting peroxyl radicals. Omega-6 and omega-3 PUFAs form peroxidation products like malondialdehyde, 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) , isoprostanes or 9- and 13-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acids. Here’s a study from 2015 for more on PUFA chemistry.  PUFAs are not stable at the physiological temperature of ~37°C. When anti-oxidant action is lacking

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Episode 23 – Tucker Goodrich dishes on bad fats

Show notes: Tucker’s blog is http://yelling-stop.blogspot.com and his Twitter is @tuckergoodrich Could avoiding seed oils be why Tucker, I and others have noticed the same anecdotal experience of increased resistance to sunburn? We discuss the apportioning of seed oils, refined flours and sugars to diseases of civilization (2004) Brief episode of STZ-induced hyperglycemia produces cardiac abnormalities in rats fed a diet rich in n-6 PUFA “In summary, chronic caloric excess of n-6 PUFA when coupled with acute diabetes of only 4 days precipitated mitochondrial

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Episode 22 – Dietary (in)sanity with Dr.Ede

Show notes: Dr.Ede’s interesting professional background includes working as lab assistant in places like the Joslin Diabetes Center and the SUNY Stony Brook Department of Dermatology. She also became an M.D. at the University of Vermont College of Medicine and completed her residency in adult psychiatry at Harvard. In 2012 she completed a graduate course in nutrition from the Harvard School of Public Health entitled “The Science of Human Nutrition”. She is now the psychiatrist for Smith College (Northampton, Massachusetts)

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Episode 21 – measuring Acetyl-CoA in a live rat, for the sake of metabolism

Show notes: A Non-invasive Method to Assess Hepatic Acetyl-CoA In Vivo (Perry and Shulman et al. 2017) Background Futile fat cycling “Regulation is easier if competing reactions are maintained in a cycling steady-state and then biased in one or another direction. This becomes, in the end, more efficient  than starts and stops in response to different conditions” Acetyl-CoA contributes to GNG, glucose oxidation, protein acetylation and the synthesis of steroids as well as fatty acids Episode 1 Break Nutrition study

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Episode 20 – Sweet, sweet insulin and you

Show notes: Sweet taste receptor signaling in beta cells mediates fructose-induced potentiation of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (Kyriazis et al. 2012) Background Beta-cell metabolized nutrients (e.g. amino acids & glucose) stimulate insulin secretion whilst GLP-1 interacts with the beta-cell’s cell-surface GPCRs to stimulate insulin secretion [G-protein coupled receptor] There are many more Non-metabolizable insulin secretagogues than Metabolizable ones TRPM5 (Transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily M member 5) is found on surface of beta-cells, transducing taste for bitter, sweet, umami &

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Episode 19 – Marty Kendall on nutrient dense diets

Show notes: Marty Kendall launched https://optimisingnutrition.com/ in 2015 and has 2 excellent Facebook groups called Optimising Nutrition and Marty Kendall’s Nutrient Optimiser Marty explains how his engineering background helps him make sense of nutrition science What’s the nutrient optimizer? Marty explains his 3-pronged approach for recommending foods based on their insulin index, nutrient density and energy density We discuss the fact that RDIs (recommended daily intake of nutrients) were established in omnivorous diets (relatively) high in carbohydrates and how this

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Episode 18 – Peter Ballerstedt PhD: better nutrition through sustainable agriculture

Show notes: Peter gives his academic and professional background. Peter explains how his study of forage agronomy dove-tailed into his interest in nutrition after being faced with a diagnosis of diabetes. Peter defines ruminants. Peter explains how ruminants can reverse desertification, rendering land productive that otherwise cannot grow crops. Peter discusses the ratio of omega-6-to-omega-3 fats in our foods and how different food for cows affect the ratio in their meat Peter explains how absolute quantities of these fats might

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Episode 17 – Dr.Shawn Baker lifts like a crane and eats like a lion

Show notes: Amy Berger’s question “do you think the types of food we consume (and possibly even the amount) affect our nutrient requirements?” Comment 1: ”it seems like our requirements would be determined at least in part by the metabolic processes we have going on, and an all-meat diet might depend on particular processes more or less than an omnivorous low-carb diet, or a vegan diet, high-carb, or any other approach” Comment 2: “it seems like whatever was taken into

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Episode 16 – The curious case of Dr. Ted Naiman

[warning: choppy audio in certain sections, my apologies ] In this episode I ask Dr.Ted Naiman the following questions:   How should doctors post patient results online and how not to do so? What’s the biggest misconception doctors have regarding diabetes? What’s the biggest misconception patients have regarding fat-loss? Dr.Naiman makes wonderful memes to explain concepts about health and nutrition. What’s a Protein-Sparing Modified Fast (PSMF)? Dr.Eric Westman places a lot of emphasis on carbohydrate restriction and very little on

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Episode 15 – how do mTORC2 and ChREBP-β keep the fat cycle going?

Show notes: Study 1: “Adipose tissue mTORC2 regulates ChREBP-driven de novo lipogenesis and hepatic glucose metabolism” (2013 Tang et al.) This study looked at the activity of mTORC2 in the adipose tissue of miceFloxed-KO mice missing Rictor, a key element in the mTORC2 complex, were used in this study In the liver, de novo lipogenesis (DNL) correlates with insulin resistance (IR) but in white adipose tissue (WAT) it correlated with insulin sensitivity (IS) The activity of Carbohydrate-response Element Binding Protein

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