Episode 12 – Decoding Cholesterol with Dave Feldman

Short summary: I talk to engineer Dave Feldman about what his dietary self-experiments taught him cholesterol in human physiology. His “N = 1” experimentation is not only very interesting and rigorous but most importantly, it cannot be explained by current mainstream notions in lipidology. We also discuss the implications that this may have for cardiovascular disease. Show notes: Dave Feldman is known as the Christian Bale of nutrition for his extreme self-experiments where he ate 5,000 kcals per day, or

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Episode 11 – Obesity: a bird’s eye view

Short summary: In episode 11 Gabor selects 2 papers on the physiology of migrating birds that fatten up for their voyage and we discuss what this can tell us about human obesity. The first paper is from 2002 by Bairlein and is called “How to get fat: nutritional mechanisms of seasonal fat accumulation in migratory songbirds” http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12008967. The second is called “Adipose energy stores, physical work, and the metabolic syndrome: lessons from hummingbirds” http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16351726 and is by Hargrove et al.

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Episode 10 – Medical uses of ketogenic and low carb diets with Ellen Davis

Short summary: With guest Ellen Davis we discuss the many medical applications of ketogenic and low carb diets, all of which is explored in depth in her 3 books “Fighting Cancer with a Ketogenic Diet”, “The Ketogenic Diet for Type 1 Diabetes” and “Conquering Type 2 Diabetes with a Ketogenic Diet”. Show notes: • Ellen’s books “Fighting Cancer with a Ketogenic Diet”, “The Ketogenic Diet for Type 1 Diabetes” and “Conquering Type 2 Diabetes with a Ketogenic Diet” • Who

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Episode 9 – Amy Berger’s new book “The Alzheimer’s Antidote”, gluconeogenesis and exogenous ketones

Short summary: In her new book “The Alzheimer’s Antidote”, Amy Berger explains how improving one’s metabolism through a well-formulated low-carb high-fat diet is a worthwhile strategy to manage the disease. We then discuss how ‘excess protein’ is an overblown concern when it comes keeping adequately low blood sugar by not excessively stimulating gluconeogenesis. Lastly, we discuss the right and wrong reasons to sell and use exogenous ketones. Show notes: We first discuss Amy Berger’s background as a registered dietician, her

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Episode 8 – starch digestibility and limitations of the glycemic response

In episode 8 of the Break Nutrition show we discuss 2 papers which explore the glycemic, insulin and incretin responses and how the digestibility of starch as well as the apportioning of endogenous vs exogenous glucose comes into play. The paper from 2012 is “Slowly and rapidly digestible starchy foods can elicit a similar glycemic response because of differential tissue glucose uptake in healthy men” http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22990033. The paper from 2015 is “Plasma glucose kinetics and response of insulin and GIP

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Episode 7 – How processed starches affect metabolic responses

The first paper discussed is from 1989 and is called “Insulin and glycemic responses in healthy humans to native starches processed in different ways: correlation with in vitro alpha-amylase hydrolysis” Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2667315 18 subjects eat 35g of starch that is either raw, gelled (boiled & cooled) or made into a paste (via mechanical extrusion). In vitro α-hydrolysis with α-amylase of differently processed starches correlate strongly (r2 = 0.95, p < 0.0001) with the glycemic and insulin responses of 18 human subjects

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Episode 6 – why bariatric surgery improves metabolic parameters quickly

Episode 5 of the Break Nutrition Show Gabor and I  had a discussion about the paper called “Mechanisms facilitating weight loss and resolution of type 2 diabetes following bariatric surgery”. Mechanisms facilitating weight loss and resolution of type 2 diabetes following bariatric surgery Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20133150 Bariatric surgery is more akin to metabolic surgery than a procedure to mechanically restricting food intake The 3 classical categories of bariatric surgery (1) restrictive (2) malabsorptive (3) hybrid of 1 & 2 Improvement of metabolic

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Episode 5 – how enlarged adipocytes overloaded with lipids lead to insulin resistance

 Episode 5 of the Break Nutrition Show Gabor and I  had a discussion about the paper called “Lipid-overloaded enlarged adipocytes provoke insulin resistance independent of inflammation”, covering the following points (and more): Link: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25733684 The concept of IR occurring after the lipid-derived enlargement of adipocytes (as opposed to the other model of IR preceding it) The difference in mild/early-stage obesity versus severe/late-stage obesity Mechanisms whereby adipocyte-focused inflammation appears necessary to make adipocytes more insulin resistance in severe/late-stage obesity but not in

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Episode 4 – the rate at which sugar is absorbed by the gastro intestinal system affects obesity, diabetes and metabolic health

In episode 4 we discuss why the rate at which you absorb sugar may affect obesity, diabetes and general metabolic health, here is the 2 papers discussed: Effects of small intestinal glucose on glycaemia, insulinaemia and incretin hormone release are load-dependent in obese subjects Link: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27840416 Accelerated intestinal glucose absorption in morbidly obese humans: relationship to glucose transporters, incretin hormones, and glycemia Link: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25423571

Episode 3 – Affecting fat loss in rodents by caloric restriction, knocking out insulin genes and seeing how incretin hormones play into it

In Episode 3 of the Break Nutrition show we discussed rodent studies showing an insulin gene dosage-dependent effect on adiposity, the interplay between caloric restriction & circulating insulin, as well as how incretin hormones affect fat loss dynamics. Caloric Restriction Paradoxically Increases Adiposity in Mice With Genetically Reduced Insulin. Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/27145011/ Suppression of hyperinsulinaemia in growing female mice provides long-term protection against obesity. Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/26155745/?i=3&from=/27145011/related