Blog Posts

Episode 2 – trafficking fatty acids properly to avoid ectopic fat deposition

In Episode 2 of the BreakNutrition Show we talked about how dysregulated cycling of fat between fat cells, the liver and the fat we eat can lead to obesity, here is the paper: Downregulation of adipose tissue fatty acid trafficking in obesity: a driver for ectopic fat deposition? Link: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20943748

Are low-carb diets good for high-intensity training?

Women training with corde

Probably. For an even lower-carb ketogenic diet, maybe. It’s a controversial topic within the sports nutrition sphere. We should already know, but don’t, in part because of the corrupt practices in the sports nutrition industry (check out Tim Noakes’ book for an example [1]). What 2 studies say about training low-carb or ketogenic One 2006 study said sprint times of cyclists doing a high-intensity 4 kilometer time-trial were significantly slower on a low-carb high-fat diet than when on a high-carb

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Episode 1 – Linking dysregulated adipocyte fat flow to diabetes

In Episode 1 of the BreakNutrition Show we talked about how how dysregulated fat flow from fat cells can drive the creation of new glucose in the liver and lead to diabetes, here is the paper: Hepatic acetyl CoA links adipose tissue inflammation to hepatic insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25662011

Good fats vs bad fats Part 2: are saturated fats bad?

peanuts on a table

Fats, where they at? Fats (or fatty acids) are fascinating. Humans eat fat, make fat and outsource the production of fat to bacteria living inside them. Take saturated fatty acids for example and more specifically, butyric acid [1]. It’s the main SFA in butter as well as the saturated fatty acids produced by bacteria in your colon (like Faecalibacterium prausnitzii [2]). These critters make it by eating the fiber you ate. Butyric acid is also found in the fermented beverage Kombucha [3].

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Good fats vs bad fats Part 1: how much and which ones?

Salmon cocked in a plate

Whether on a low-fat high-carbohydrate diet (HCLF) or on a low-carbohydrate high-fat diet (LCHF)(see more: Kickstart your basic keto diet), you’re going to be eating fats (fatty acids). Some of these are essential, which is why we talk about essential fatty acids (EFAs). You don’t actually need that much of them, maybe less than 1% of total calories [1]. As these are essential fatty acids [2] they need to be balanced [3]. What are the essential fatty acids for humans? Here, essential

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Should you include fasting in your diet?

meter on a wooden plate

What is fasting? Fasting is not about eating +3 meals a day thing, very few people do it nowadays. Given what fast food actually is, it’s not surprising actually: it’s easily accessible it’s quick and simple to consume even when full, it causes cravings for more The Ancient Greeks fasted [1] though. Most religions have traditions of occasional fasting [2]. I typically eat 2 meals a day which means not eating for about 12 – 16hrs a day. This is pattern

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How to be in ketosis?

rosted meat

Different ways to be in Ketosis  Be a new-born baby reared on breast-milk [1] Don’t eat, use a diet that includes fasting [2] Use up your glycogen by exercising [3] Eat a high-fat diet [4], low in carbs with moderate protein Take exogenous ketones [5] (aka ketones in a pill) Ketosis is a metabolic state. It is normal for humans to be in and out of ketosis. Once your body starts relying on lots of fat for energy you get into ketosis.

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Breaking nutrition myths and beyond

Ketogenic foods

At Break Nutrition we slay diet myths, resurrect time-tested principles and keep our views updated with the best that science has to offer. It’s a process. There’s a lot of material to cover because the world of nutrition is filled with contradictory advice. One day paleo is the hottest diet trend on Google and another it’s vegan or Zone. Soon it’ll be keto (mark my words). Not everyone can learn all the necessary medicine, biochemistry, paleoanthropology and statistics required to

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