Blog Posts

Sweet and Rusty: the link between sugar, glycation and joint health

red meat with cooking plate

What do rusty cars and squeaky knees have in common? As embarrassing as it is to admit, I only have a passing knowledge of the inner workings of an automobile. I’m sad to say that my father will be the last generation of Bakers that can easily change the oil in his car. If my sons, or daughters learn, it won’t be from dear old dad. Likely they’ll be shuttled about by Uber-esque driverless cars whilst staring at their phones

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The Ketogenic Diet 101: Make Fat Work for You

What’s a ketogenic diet? A diet is ketogenic when it is very high in fat, high enough to cause a change in your metabolism whereby more fat is turned into ketone bodies rather than being directly oxidized into a form of cellular energy called ATP. Like fats, these ketone bodies (or ketones) can also be oxidized to make ATP.   For this metabolic switch to happen, not only must there be a lot of calories coming from fat, it’s also

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Episode 5 – how enlarged adipocytes overloaded with lipids lead to insulin resistance

 Episode 5 of the Break Nutrition Show Gabor and I  had a discussion about the paper called “Lipid-overloaded enlarged adipocytes provoke insulin resistance independent of inflammation”, covering the following points (and more): Link: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25733684 The concept of IR occurring after the lipid-derived enlargement of adipocytes (as opposed to the other model of IR preceding it) The difference in mild/early-stage obesity versus severe/late-stage obesity Mechanisms whereby adipocyte-focused inflammation appears necessary to make adipocytes more insulin resistance in severe/late-stage obesity but not in

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Episode 4 – the rate at which sugar is absorbed by the gastro intestinal system affects obesity, diabetes and metabolic health

In episode 4 we discuss why the rate at which you absorb sugar may affect obesity, diabetes and general metabolic health, here is the 2 papers discussed: Effects of small intestinal glucose on glycaemia, insulinaemia and incretin hormone release are load-dependent in obese subjects Link: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27840416 Accelerated intestinal glucose absorption in morbidly obese humans: relationship to glucose transporters, incretin hormones, and glycemia Link: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25423571

Ketogenic diet and Vitamin C: the 101

Vitamin C and ketogenic diet

Written by Amber O’Hearn (MSc Computer Science). Find more of her writings at www.ketotic.org   The Recommended Daily Allowances (RDA) for different nutrients were developed on Western diets, and therefore, high-carb diets. Given that a ketogenic metabolism uses different metabolic pathways and induces cascades of drastically different metabolic and physiological effects, it would be astonishing if any of the RDAs are entirely applicable as is. One micronutrient that seems to be particularly warranting reassessment is vitamin C, because vitamin C

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Low-carb diet lowdown

empty plate with small meat

What’s a carb? A common way to classify food is by dividing it up into 3 kind of molecules called fat, carbohydrate and protein. These are the 3 macronutrients (ignoring alcohol). Fatty acids make up fat, amino acids make up protein and sugars make up carbohydrate. Calories from a diet can come from these 3 macronutrients. A low-carbohydrate diet is one necessarily higher in fat and a low-fat diet is one necessarily higher in carbohydrate. How much fats or carbs

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Episode 3 – Affecting fat loss in rodents by caloric restriction, knocking out insulin genes and seeing how incretin hormones play into it

In Episode 3 of the Break Nutrition show we discussed rodent studies showing an insulin gene dosage-dependent effect on adiposity, the interplay between caloric restriction & circulating insulin, as well as how incretin hormones affect fat loss dynamics. Caloric Restriction Paradoxically Increases Adiposity in Mice With Genetically Reduced Insulin. Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/27145011/ Suppression of hyperinsulinaemia in growing female mice provides long-term protection against obesity. Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/26155745/?i=3&from=/27145011/related

6 Common Fat Loss Mistakes

body scale with an apple

Mistake 1: losing fat is all about willpower Obesity was extremely rare before the concept of food calories [1] was ever invented. There’s no evidence to believe our ancestors used willpower to stay lean, even during times of abundant food. Truthfully, what our body does with the food we eat largely depends on its hormonal and metabolic states. Consciously trying to maintain ‘caloric balance’, the official advice given to the obese, fails miserably. This is undeniable in the face of

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Episode 2 – trafficking fatty acids properly to avoid ectopic fat deposition

In Episode 2 of the BreakNutrition Show we talked about how dysregulated cycling of fat between fat cells, the liver and the fat we eat can lead to obesity, here is the paper: Downregulation of adipose tissue fatty acid trafficking in obesity: a driver for ectopic fat deposition? Link: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20943748

Are low-carb diets good for high-intensity training?

Women training with corde

Probably. For an even lower-carb ketogenic diet, maybe. It’s a controversial topic within the sports nutrition sphere. We should already know, but don’t, in part because of the corrupt practices in the sports nutrition industry (check out Tim Noakes’ book for an example [1]). What 2 studies say about training low-carb or ketogenic One 2006 study said sprint times of cyclists doing a high-intensity 4 kilometer time-trial were significantly slower on a low-carb high-fat diet than when on a high-carb

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