Blog Posts

Episode 8 – starch digestibility and limitations of the glycemic response

In episode 8 of the Break Nutrition show we discuss 2 papers which explore the glycemic, insulin and incretin responses and how the digestibility of starch as well as the apportioning of endogenous vs exogenous glucose comes into play. The paper from 2012 is “Slowly and rapidly digestible starchy foods can elicit a similar glycemic response because of differential tissue glucose uptake in healthy men” http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22990033. The paper from 2015 is “Plasma glucose kinetics and response of insulin and GIP

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3 ways to measures ketones: which is best?

3 ways to measures ketones- which is best?

Intro: the age of Do-It-Yourself at-home medical technology The medico-technological age we’re in goes by many names, such as biohacking, self-experimentation or the quantified self. A lot of it is about tracking biochemical markers and performance metrics that can tell you something about your past and present state, usually in an attempt to predict or change it in the future. Ketones are one such biochemical marker of metabolism that can be measured in blood, breath and urine (see our What’s

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How ketogenesis and ketones Treat Inflammation

turmeric cumin

Intro Inflammation is a biological mechanism our bodies use to deal with internal and external events, such as combatting infections, repairing tissues or mitigating the immediate consequences of a fractured bone. However, it often carries a negative connotation since many diseases provoke symptoms through the process of inflammation. So although it is absolutely necessary for keeping the human body functioning properly, like so many things in biology, too much or too little is the problem. Inflammation can be managed with

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Episode 7 – How processed starches affect metabolic responses

The first paper discussed is from 1989 and is called “Insulin and glycemic responses in healthy humans to native starches processed in different ways: correlation with in vitro alpha-amylase hydrolysis” Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2667315 18 subjects eat 35g of starch that is either raw, gelled (boiled & cooled) or made into a paste (via mechanical extrusion). In vitro α-hydrolysis with α-amylase of differently processed starches correlate strongly (r2 = 0.95, p < 0.0001) with the glycemic and insulin responses of 18 human subjects

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Do ketogenic diets have a place in human evolution?

Ketogenic diet evolution

Part 1: How to think about ketogenic diets within human evolutionary history In the past decade ketogenic diets in humans have started to attract the attention of a few forward thinking researchers as well as a small number of online health enthusiasts. In any diet there are three main elements called macronutrients – fat, protein and carbohydrate. On a ketogenic diet most calories come from fat (65-90%), a moderate amount from protein (<10-25%) and a small amount from carbohydrate (0-15%).

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Episode 6 – why bariatric surgery improves metabolic parameters quickly

Episode 5 of the Break Nutrition Show Gabor and I  had a discussion about the paper called “Mechanisms facilitating weight loss and resolution of type 2 diabetes following bariatric surgery”. Mechanisms facilitating weight loss and resolution of type 2 diabetes following bariatric surgery Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20133150 Bariatric surgery is more akin to metabolic surgery than a procedure to mechanically restricting food intake The 3 classical categories of bariatric surgery (1) restrictive (2) malabsorptive (3) hybrid of 1 & 2 Improvement of metabolic

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Sweet and Rusty: the link between sugar, glycation and joint health

red meat with cooking plate

What do rusty cars and squeaky knees have in common? As embarrassing as it is to admit, I only have a passing knowledge of the inner workings of an automobile. I’m sad to say that my father will be the last generation of Bakers that can easily change the oil in his car. If my sons, or daughters learn, it won’t be from dear old dad. Likely they’ll be shuttled about by Uber-esque driverless cars whilst staring at their phones

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The Ketogenic Diet 101: Make Fat Work for You

What’s a ketogenic diet? A diet is ketogenic when it is very high in fat, high enough to cause a change in your metabolism whereby more fat is turned into ketone bodies rather than being directly oxidized into a form of cellular energy called ATP. Like fats, these ketone bodies (or ketones) can also be oxidized to make ATP.   For this metabolic switch to happen, not only must there be a lot of calories coming from fat, it’s also

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Episode 5 – how enlarged adipocytes overloaded with lipids lead to insulin resistance

 Episode 5 of the Break Nutrition Show Gabor and I  had a discussion about the paper called “Lipid-overloaded enlarged adipocytes provoke insulin resistance independent of inflammation”, covering the following points (and more): Link: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25733684 The concept of IR occurring after the lipid-derived enlargement of adipocytes (as opposed to the other model of IR preceding it) The difference in mild/early-stage obesity versus severe/late-stage obesity Mechanisms whereby adipocyte-focused inflammation appears necessary to make adipocytes more insulin resistance in severe/late-stage obesity but not in

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Episode 4 – the rate at which sugar is absorbed by the gastro intestinal system affects obesity, diabetes and metabolic health

In episode 4 we discuss why the rate at which you absorb sugar may affect obesity, diabetes and general metabolic health, here is the 2 papers discussed: Effects of small intestinal glucose on glycaemia, insulinaemia and incretin hormone release are load-dependent in obese subjects Link: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27840416 Accelerated intestinal glucose absorption in morbidly obese humans: relationship to glucose transporters, incretin hormones, and glycemia Link: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25423571